Cicero on Oratory and Orators eBook

De Oratore (On the Orator; not to be confused with Orator) is a dialogue written by Cicero in 55 BCE. It is set in 91 BCE, when Lucius Licinius Crassus dies, just before the Social War and the civil war between Marius and Sulla, during which Marcus Antonius Orator, the other great orator of this dialogue, dies.

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AUTHOR
Marcus Tullius Cicero
FILESIZE
1,22 MB
PUBLISH DATE
12 Aug 2015
LANGUAGE
English
ISBN
9781298757395

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In On the Ideal Orator, (De oratore), Cicero, the greatest Roman orator and prosewriter of his day, gives his mature views on rhetoric, oratory, and philosophy.Cast in the lively, literary form of a dialogue, this classic work presents a daring view of the orator as the master of all language communication while still emphasizing his role at the heart of Roman society and,